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Governing Body meeting

NHS Cornwall Events - Tue, 02/02/2021 - 11:30
Information on NHS Kernow's February 2021 Governing Body meeting.
Categories: Health

Governing Body meeting

NHS Cornwall Events - Tue, 01/12/2020 - 11:30
Information on NHS Kernow's December 2020 Governing Body meeting.
Categories: Health

Council applauds community spirit to help struggling families this half term

Cornwall Council - Latest News - 1 hour 28 min ago

Cornwall Council’s portfolio holder for children, Cllr Sally Hawken said: "The government were right to provide free school meals during the last two holidays and quite simply are failing children by not continuing this provision. We welcome the community spirit seen in Cornwall throughout this pandemic that carries on regardless of how hard things get. We offer a sincere thank you for everything our communities are doing to support struggling families this half term. We would like to place on record our wholehearted support for Marcus Rashford’s ‘End child food poverty’ campaign.

“No family should ever be faced with the worry and anxiety of not being able to provide for their children in the holidays.”

Since 2018 Cornwall Council has a run a summer programme called ‘Filling the Holiday Gap’, which provided small grants to community groups and volunteer organisations to provide activities and food for children and young people in the greatest need. During the pandemic the scheme was used to provide vouchers to those that missed the deadline for the government vouchers.  This year the Council will be providing a scheme to support all those receiving Free School Meals for the Christmas holidays.

Like the rest of the country, the effect of the coronavirus pandemic in Cornwall has been profound. Many families have seen their financial circumstances negatively impacted by lockdown, including the significant number working in Cornwall’s tourist and leisure industry. The number of children accessing Free School Meals has dramatically increased since the start of the pandemic in March.  Cornwall Council figures show that 13,000 children are currently accessing the scheme, which entitles them to a hot and nutritious meal.

An all-party parliamentary report in 2017 found that poorer children who are hungry in the holidays fall an extra month behind their peers in the new term. The important contribution a healthy, nutritious school lunch makes towards children’s wider wellbeing cannot be underestimated.

Businesses across Cornwall, from Ann’s Pasties in Helston to Rosie’s Kitchen in Bude, are joining Castle Beach Cafe in Falmouth in offering lunch bags and meals to families struggling to children who normally get a free school meal. More information about businesses and community groups offering free meals during half term is available on the Cornwall Live website https://www.cornwalllive.com/news/cornwall-news/free-school-meal-cornwall-businesses-4633489?cmpredirect=

Cllr Sally Hawken said: "As ever the community of Cornwall has not hesitated to step in, with a large number of businesses, community groups and amazing individuals offering to provide free meals for children across Cornwall and I truly thank them for their compassion and generosity.  But what we need is a sustainable funding plan from government that meets this need long term.

“This year the Council will be providing a scheme to support all those receiving Free School Meals for the Christmas holidays.”

If you are in a position to provide support to Cornwall's ‘Filling the holiday gap programme’ this Christmas or during other school holidays, through resources or funding, please contact: phdesk@cornwall.gov.uk

Please also support your local foodbank. Cornish foodbanks are providing vital support to families and people in need of help. Transformation Cornwall has details of many foodbanks

https://togethernetwork.org.uk/uploads/shared/Update-on-Cornish-Foodbanks-23.10.20.pdf and many local communities run their own scheme as well.

Ends

 

Categories: Councils, Politics

Street cleaner neatly swerved around piles of leaves blocking drains Steamers Hill, 26th October

What's the point of road sweeping if you avoid the leaves, gouge a slippery entrance to Back Lane and leave the leaves choking the drain? Can't have been blocked by parked cars. More attention to detail please - we only see sweepers about twice a year and shame one of our rare visits was a waste of time
Nearest road to the pin placed on the map (automatically generated by Bing Maps): 16 Steamers Hill, Angarrack
Report on FixMyStreet
Categories: FixMyStreet

Street cleaner neatly swerved around piles of leaves blocking drains Steamers Hill, 26th October

What's the point of road sweeping if you avoid the leaves, gouge a slippery entrance to Back Lane and leave the leaves choking the drain? Can't have been blocked by parked cars. More attention to detail please - we only see sweepers about twice a year and shame one of our rare visits was a waste of time
Nearest road to the pin placed on the map (automatically generated by Bing Maps): 16 Steamers Hill, Angarrack
Report on FixMyStreet
Categories: FixMyStreet

High demand for Cornwall Council’s planning services

Cornwall Council - Latest News - 5 hours 41 min ago

Residents, planning agents and those buying homes in Cornwall are asked to be patient as the Council’s planning service experiences high demand. 

The Planning and Sustainable Development service has continued to operate throughout the challenges of this year as the coronavirus pandemic impacts everyone’s lives, but it has had to adapt the way in which it works – all while dealing with an unusually high level of enquiries. 

Between April 2018 and March 2019 the planning service received an average of 4,666 emails each month – 233 per day. 

By comparison, between February 2020 and August 2020 it has averaged 6,000 emails a month – 300 per day. 

Enforcement complaints, where residents get in touch with the Council about a potential breach of planning permission, are currently 30 per cent higher compared to this time last year. 

September 2020’s Land Charges searches, which are required by solicitors as part of the home-buying process, were double what they were in September 2019. 

Louise Wood, Service Director for Planning & Sustainable Development at Cornwall Council, said: “We had to respond quickly to bring forward new ways of working. Many of our staff are now working remotely in line with government guidance, and will continue to do so as the situation changes.  

“However, we are experiencing an unusually high volume of enquiries, which is impacting on our response times, and we ask that people please bear with us.” 

Coronavirus restrictions mean it is not possible to discuss planning matters at council offices, but the team can be contacted via planning@cornwall.gov.uk or on 0300 1234 151. 

Planning applications continue to be determined and site visits are still being carried out in a Covid-secure way if virtual options for assessment have been exhausted. 

Cornwall Council’s Portfolio Holder for Planning, Tim Dwelly, said: “We will not delay our decision-making unnecessarily. 

“Our planning officers are dealing with a significant increase in the volume of general planning enquiries, which can result in delays with validating applications.  

“They are working hard to manage this.” 

The Council is still determining 87 per cent of applications within agreed timescales, which is consistent with its performance prior to the pandemic.  

However, remote working means that the Council is currently unable to accept hard copy planning applications. 

Applications can be submitted online via the Planning Portal or by emailing planning @cornwall.gov.uk   

Categories: Councils, Politics

A new campaign is launched to tackle exploitation in Cornwall

Cornwall Council - Latest News - 7 hours 25 min ago

Every month across the UK over six hundred young people are safeguarded from exploitation, according to figures from the National Crime Agency.  Children and young adults in Cornwall are not immune to this and we need to increase public awareness of the signs and indicators.

Today sees the launch of CETHESIGNS, a new campaign from Our Safeguarding Children Partnership and Safeguarding Adults Board, aimed at raising awareness of the dangers of child sexual exploitation and child criminal exploitation across Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly.

Chair of Our Safeguarding Children Partnership, John Clements, said: “The exploitation of children and young adults is often a hidden crime and takes many different forms.  Regardless of what form it takes, the risks that children face at the hands of the perpetrators is very real and it must be stopped.

“Our aim is that this campaign will help friends, family or members of the general public to understand what the signs are and how they can help us to protect the children and young people of Cornwall.”

Tackling the exploitation of children and young adults across Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly is a shared priority of Cornwall Council, Our Safeguarding Children Partnership, Safer Cornwall, the Safeguarding Adults Board and other agencies.

One of the key points of this campaign is that exploited children and young people might not always ‘look’ vulnerable, or ‘act’ like victims, but there are some signs to look out for that can suggest things aren’t right.

Cabinet Member for Children, Public Health and Well Being at Cornwall Council, Sally Hawken added: “The important thing to remember is exploitation can take place anywhere and it can take many forms; sexual, criminal or modern slavery. It doesn’t matter if you work with children, drive a bus, work in a hotel or serve fast food, we want you to know the signs.

“We know that when we are aware of cases of exploitation, we are quick to act. However, we need members of the public to help us to identify those situations we are not aware of and that’s why knowing the signs can make an enormous difference.”

Children and young adults in Cornwall are not immune to exploitation and this campaign has been designed to increase public awareness of the signs and indicators. This body of work links into the new three-year Cornwall Exploitation Strategy from 2020-2023 for children and young adults aged up to 25.

John concluded: “We must work together to stop child exploitation. We do this by learning the signs and reporting anything that doesn’t seem right. It doesn’t matter if you’re not completely certain. Anything that you tell us could be vital in helping to keep children and young adults safe from exploitation.”

You can find more information on the campaign by visiting the Our Safeguarding Partnership website. Here, you will also find a host of campaign resources.  

Categories: Councils, Politics

Danger road crossing, 23rd October

This junction needs a pedestrian mirror, if you have walked UP towards the railway bridge and you want to cross to walk UP Humphrey Davy Lane, you CANNOT see cars coming down from Queensway until you are on the road and with a pushchair the child is in the road first. It is a take a gamble from the only pavement under the bridge and if you are deaf or electric car is coming BUMP you are dead!
Nearest road to the pin placed on the map (automatically generated by Bing Maps): Queen's Way, Hayle
Report on FixMyStreet
Categories: FixMyStreet

Danger road crossing, 23rd October

This junction needs a pedestrian mirror, if you have walked UP towards the railway bridge and you want to cross to walk UP Humphrey Davy Lane, you CANNOT see cars coming down from Queensway until you are on the road and with a pushchair the child is in the road first. It is a take a gamble from the only pavement under the bridge and if you are deaf or electric car is coming BUMP you are dead!
Nearest road to the pin placed on the map (automatically generated by Bing Maps): Queen's Way, Hayle
Report on FixMyStreet
Categories: FixMyStreet

Cornwall Council works with the Falmouth community to safeguard Princess Pavilion

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Fri, 23/10/2020 - 15:18

Cornwall Council has pledged to support the Falmouth community in securing the long-term future of Princess Pavilion and Gyllyngdune Gardens.

As part of Cornwall Council’s devolution programme, it agreed outline plans last year to devolve Princess Pavilion and its gardens which are currently run by the leisure provider GLL.

Falmouth Town Council is holding detailed talks with local stakeholders and developing a joint business case to safeguard the future of Princess Pavilion for Falmouth.

Cornwall Council will transfer Princess Pavilion and Gyllyngdune Gardens to be used in line with an agreed business case.

Princess Pavilion has been closed since March due to Government Covid restrictions which has made it unviable to be open currently.

Cornwall Councillor Mike Eathorne-Gibbons, Cabinet member with oversight of the leisure agreement between the Council and GLL, said: “We recognise Princess Pavilion is an incredibly important asset in supporting the vibrant community of Falmouth and we will do everything we can to support its preservation.

“We are prioritising work to support a local partnership approach and we are working closely with the community so a viable plan can be established for the site as soon as possible.

“This site is of high priority in our devolution programme and we are meeting regularly with Falmouth Town Council who are seeking to work collectively with a community group in going forwards.

“We welcome a business plan being submitted from the community and our officers are supporting with supplying information relating to the site.”

Falmouth Town Mayor Steve Eva said: “The Town Council recognises the essential cultural importance of the Pavilion and Gardens to our community. We were already discussing the transfer of Gyllyngdune Gardens with Cornwall Council and the current situation means we have widened that to include the Princess Pavilion as well. There is overwhelming community support for this so we have requested that the transfers become a priority in the community asset transfer programme. We are preparing a business plan in consultation with the community and a range of stakeholders.

“We are hopeful that we can open the Gyllyngdune Gardens as soon as possible, and I received a petition from residents recently requesting that. Our gardeners are currently on site bringing it back to its usual high standard. Cornwall Council have committed to transfer the Pavilion and I hope this can be done as quickly as possible to enable us to reopen the site.”

James Curry, Head of Service for GLL in Cornwall, said: “As a social enterprise, we have always understood how precious the Princess Pavilion is to people living in Falmouth and the local area. Our team worked very hard to make it a lively and viable venue and we were all very sorry when, due to the pandemic, we had to close its doors in March.

“Discussions have been ongoing in the last few months about the Princess Pavilion’s future viability and we welcome the opportunity to consult with other local stakeholders going forward.”

 

Story posted on October 23, 2020

Categories: Councils, Politics
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